USDA’s Hands-off Approach to Gene-edited Crops Could Revolutionize Research and Development

The US Department of Agriculture’s recent decision to stay out of the business of regulating gene-edited crops could be a game changer for a sector long dominated by a handful of companies armed with massive research and development budgets.

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Golden Rice Bags International Food Safety Nod

The controversial Golden Rice, which is still being pushed in the Philippines, got a positive evaluation from the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA), concurring the variety’s safety and nutrition.

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CRISPR-Edited Rice Plants Produce Major Boost in Grain Yield

A team of scientists from Purdue University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has used CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology to develop a variety of rice that produces 25-31 percent more grain and would have been virtually impossible to create through traditional breeding methods.

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Rebooting Food: Finding New Ways to Feed the Future

Banana trees that fit in a test tube. Burgers made without a cow in sight. Fish farmed in the desert. Robots picking fruit.

Welcome to the brave new world of food, where scientists are battling a global time-bomb of climate change, water scarcity, population growth and soaring obesity rates to find new ways to feed the future.

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Give GMO a chance to boost food security: women scientists

Women scientists are calling for the adoption of biotechnology to boost food security in the country.
Under the umbrella of Women for Biosciences Network, Dr Felister Makini, the deputy director general for crop research at the Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organisation (Kalro) said that women scientists can play a bigger role in helping female farmers in rural areas understand the technologies and exploit them for food security.

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USDA Unveils GMO Label Prototypes, Still Deciding Which Products Make The List

The USDA is proposing three symbols that could indicate a product containing genetically modified ingredients, including this smiling sun. Food companies could also opt for a scannable QR code or a simple line of text.

Though it’s not yet clear which highly processed ingredients will be labeled as genetically modified foods, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has released possible designs for those labels.

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Experts find solutions for high-tech agriculture

Localities need to set up plans for hi-tech agricultural areas in accordance with regional growing and climate conditions.

This is the solution that delegates emphasised at an agriculture forum with the theme “High-tech application in agricultural production adaptation to climate change in the south central coastal areas”. The forum was held on Friday in the central city of Da Nang by the National Centre for Agricultural Extension and the Da Nang Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.

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One-stop for technical services in food, biotech sectors

BENGALURU: FOBICS – Food and Biotechnology Consultancy Services – was started with the idea of transferring technologies from the various technology-developing agencies. It provides the knowledge base and technological support to micro, small and medium enterprises by rendering competent and innovative technical services in the food and biotech sector.

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Government to roll out rice-research software

The Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) said it is developing an analysis tool that would allow researchers to fast-track the breeding of new stress-tolerant rice varieties to help farmers cope with climate change.

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Advocates seek a law on modern biotech

WHAT’S 5.41 years, or 65 months, or 1,950 days? That’s how long it takes to get all the requirements before genetically modified (GM) products can be released in the market.

Perhaps not many know it, but that’s what is happening in the Philippines.

And it means lost opportunities for the country in terms of exports, lost opportunities for farmers and lost opportunities as well for scientists and researchers.

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