Biotech Corn in the Philippines: A Country Profile

Biotech Corn in the Philippines:  A Country Profile

This monograph covers the extracted and modified section of ISAAA Brief 49: Global Status of Commercialized Biotech/GM Crops: 2014 .  It features a comprehensive overview of the adoption, impact and future prospects of biotech crops in the Philippines.

PUBLISHED BY:  International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) and SEARCA Biotechnology Information Center.

CITATION:  Aldemita, Rhodora R., Villena, Maria Monina Cecilia A., and Clive James. 2015. Biotech Corn in the Philippines:  A Country Profile. Los Baños, Laguna: International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) and Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture - Biotechnology Information Center (SEARCA BIC).

 

SUMMARY

Biotech corn adoption in the Philippines increased at an average of 5% annually since it was planted in 2003. The Philippine regulatory system established since 1992, revised and updated in 1999, 2002, and 2006 with various amendments and supporting memoranda set the adoption of biotech corn in the Philippines. Research institutions that were established to conduct research on biotechnology have been amply supported by government and
international sources. Scientists and government continue to support biotech crop research in the Philippines with locally-developed biotech crops in the pipeline: beta carotene-enriched rice, insect resistant eggplant and cotton, and virus resistant papaya. Farmers and farmer leaders express support for biotech crops and share their stories on how they are benefiting from the technology.

Download PDF copy of this monograph.

Science and Popular Media: How Cartoonists Visualize Crop Biotechnology

Science and Popular Media: How Cartoonists Visualize Crop Biotechnology

Cartoons and other popular art forms such as comic strips and animation can sometimes be more powerful than words in conveying messages. They go beyond just giving information. By reflecting on popular contemporary ideas, cartoons elicit emotions that encourage interest, inquiry, and empathy.
Readers are attracted to cartoons because of its subtle humor and ability to communicate several messages in a visual and simple way.

PUBLISHED BY:  International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotechnology Applications (ISAAA)

CITATION:  Navarro, Mariechel, Kristine Natividad, Sophia Mercado, and Jenny Panopio. 2012. Visual
Representation of Science: How Cartoonists Define Biotechnology. International Service for the
Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) and SEAMEO Southeast Asian Regional Center for
Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA): Los Banos, Laguna, Philippines.

 

A study conducted by the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications
(ISAAA)
aimed to determine how cartoonists in Philippine national newspapers “define” biotechnology. A sample of cartoons published during 2000-2009 were analyzed as to message, tone (negative, positive or neutral), and use of frame, visual metaphor, and symbols. Absence of concrete products and unfamiliarity with the topic in the initial years of media coverage resulted in cartoons that favored the use of the fear appeal.

In 2011, ISAAA and the SEAMEO Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA) – Biotechnology Information Center organized BiotechToons, a contest for cartoonists on biotechnology in collaboration with the Philippine International Cartoons, Comics, and Animation (PICCA), Inc. When provided with science based resources in media and expert formats, cartoonists were able to provide a broader perspective or more substantive overview of the technology.

Aside from the Philippines, other countries within the ISAAA biotech information network such as China, Kenya, and India are using different cartoon formats to help popularize crop biotechnology concepts and issues.

Download PDF copy from ISAAA website.

Adoption and Uptake Pathways of Biotechnology Crops: The Case of Biotech Corn Farmers in Selected Provinces of Luzon, Philippines

Adoption and Uptake Pathways of Biotechnology Crops: The Case of Biotech Corn Farmers in Selected Provinces of Luzon, Philippines

FOREWORD

Biotechnology crops have been the center of public concern for a time. Critics have raised many issues against these crops which being devoid of scientific evidence have failed to gain ground. On the contrary, after more than 15 years of commercial use, biotech crops have demonstrated the immense benefits they can contribute in terms of economic productivity, environmental protection, and upliftment of the welfare of poor farmers in many parts of the world.

PUBLISHED BY:  College of Development Communication, UP Los Baños (CDC-UPLB) The International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) SEAMEO Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA)

CITATION: Torres, Cleofe S., Edmund G. Centeno, Romel A. Daya, Ma. Teresita B. Osalia, and Juvy N. Gopela. 2012. Adoption and Update Pathways of Biotechnology Crops: The Case of Biotech Farmers in Selected Provinces of Luzon. College of Development Communication, International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA) SEAsiaCenter, and SEAMEO Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA): Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines.

 

But are the farmers adopting biotech crops aware of these benefits even before they start to plant these crops? With minimal or no knowledge at all on its purported benefits, how do they come to embrace such crops? Who influences them to try out the biotech crops and how is their adoption sustained? What are the dynamics of knowledge seeking and sharing among them? These are the key questions that this study probes into.

Complementing the statistics, the study also attempts to capture the process that the farmers go through as they acquire and eventually apply the knowledge and practices pertaining to cultivation of biotech corn. Beyond adoption, the study further elaborates on the dynamics of how farmers share their experience, good or bad, with other farmers in and outside their communities. There is indeed a variety of uptake pathways among farmer groups. It is noteworthy, that they do exhibit a certain pattern, and this is a growth point for new learning on the social processes that govern the farmers’ behavior towards biotech crops.

Download PDF copy from ISAAA website.

 

Brief 40: Communicating Crop Biotechnology: Stories from Stakeholders

Brief 40: Communicating Crop Biotechnology: Stories from Stakeholders

This book, published by the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications, features 49 collective stories from 14 countries, and was written by 19 authors from ISAAA’s Global Knowledge Center (KC) and the Biotechnology Information Centers (BICs). It highlights well-documented stories from different stakeholders on the benefits of crop biotechnology and the ways by which the ISAAA’s global knowledge sharing network responded to their need for accurate, and science-based information on crop biotechnology.

PUBLISHED BY:  The International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA).

CITATION:  Navarro, Mariechel J. (Ed.) 2009. Communicating Crop Biotechnology: Stories from Stakeholders. ISAAA Brief No. 40. ISAAA: Ithaca, NY.

 

Download PDF copy from ISAAA website.

Here are some of the collective stories from Filipino academics, scientists, religious personalities, farmers and technology adoptors, media practitioners, and NGOs whom the SEARCA BIC and ISAAA KC have greatly contributed to their awareness, understanding, and acceptance of the technology:

Farmers:

  • Rosalie Ellasus: Lady Corn Farmer Goes International
  • Edwin Paraluman: Walking Tall in Biotech Debate

Media:

  • Melody Aguiba: Multi-Awarded Science Writer
  • Edita Burgos: Revolutionizing Media’s Role in Biotech Advocacy

Academics and Scientists:

  • Dr. Emil Javier: Tral Blazing Biotech in the Philippines
  • Cynthia Hedreyda: Molding Students into Future Scientists

Religious Sector:

  • Fr. Emmanuel Alparce: The Morality of Genetic Engineering

Other Partners:

  • The UPLB Genetics and Cell Biological Societies: Sharing Biotech Information to Students
  • Biotechnology Coalition of the Philippines: Advancing Biotechnology through Partnerships

To read these articles, click on the listing below:



To obtain a copy of and to learn more about this publication, please contact:
ISAAA Global Knowledge Center
c/o IRRI DAPO Box 7777
Metro Manila, Republic of the Philippines
Telefax: +63 49 536-7216 / +63 2 845-0606
E-mail: knowledge.center@isaaa.org